Author Archives: tylerzubot

Colonial Influences in Mathematics Education

The Saskatchewan mathematics curriculum presents one single method to learning. It has been quite a few years since I’ve been in a high school classroom but, to the best of my recollection, the Saskatchewan mathematics curriculum offers a single approach to find particular answers. It is highly regimented, rigid, linear, and wooden in its approaches. … Continue reading Colonial Influences in Mathematics Education Continue reading

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Learning From Place

The article Learning From Place by Restoule et al. records the events of a river excursion in which youth, adults, and elders from Fort Albany First Nation attempted to rediscover traditional Mushkegowuk ways of knowing and to rebuild their relationship with the land. The group hoped to accomplish this by reinforcing the notion of Paquataskimik … Continue reading Learning From Place Continue reading

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The Lenses Through Which I’ve Learned

How has your upbringing/schooling shaped how you “read the world?” What biases and lenses do you bring to the classroom? How might we unlearn / work against these biases? The literature I was exposed to in school was predominantly written by American or British authors speaking from their American or British perspectives. These perspectives, while … Continue reading The Lenses Through Which I’ve Learned Continue reading

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Development of Curriculum

Part 1) According to the Levin article, how are school curricula developed and implemented? What new information/perspectives does this reading provide about the development and implementation of school curriculum? Is there anything that surprises you or maybe that concerns you? According to Levin’s article, curriculum is developed by a key group of actors: national, local, … Continue reading Development of Curriculum Continue reading

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Why bother teaching Treaty Education or teaching from Indigenous Peoples’ perspectives?

Why emphasize Treaty Education? What is the point of implementing it and teaching about Indigenous Peoples’ perspectives in classrooms that may not have a single Indigenous student? Does it have any value? Any merit? Yes. One thousand times, yes. Treaty Education is not just a topic for Indigenous students. Treaty Education impacts each and every … Continue reading Why bother teaching Treaty Education or teaching from Indigenous Peoples’ perspectives? Continue reading

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Kumashiro’s critique of the “good” student.

In the second chapter of his work, Kumashiro makes clear the preconceived notions that so many hold. According to “common sense”, being a “good” student is fitting the mould. A “good” student is one who does not rock the boat by challenging the accepted norms of society. They sit quietly, listen intently, learn the content … Continue reading Kumashiro’s critique of the “good” student. Continue reading

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Out with the old, in with the…old: Wayne Au’s take on Standardization and Curriculum

In his article, Teaching under the new Taylorism: high-stakes testing and the standardization of the 21st century curriculum, Wayne Au discusses the historical implementation of scientific management to the education process, as well as the effects of standardized testing in the public schools of the United States. Scientific management, as made popular by the likes … Continue reading Out with the old, in with the…old: Wayne Au’s take on Standardization and Curriculum Continue reading

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Reflections on Smith’s Four Models of Curriculum Theory and Practice

In their article Curriculum Theory and Practice, Smith discusses four models of curriculum. Each model has its own strengths and weaknesses as well as implications for the classroom. Smith discusses curriculum as transmitted, product, process, and praxis. 1. Curriculum as a Body of Knowledge to be Transmitted Curriculum as a body of knowledge to be transmitted … Continue reading Reflections on Smith’s Four Models of Curriculum Theory and Practice Continue reading

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Common sense is not as common sense as one would think.

In the introduction to their book Against Common Sense: Teaching and Learning Toward Social Justice, Kumashiro discusses The Problem of Common Sense. In the simplest of terms, Kumashiro defines “common sense” as that which everyone should know; those thoughts and practices that are unspoken, commonplace, and assumed. “Common sense” is largely implicit although it varies … Continue reading Common sense is not as common sense as one would think. Continue reading

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